Nigel Farage condemned for calling an Afrikan Emancipation Day march 'terrifying'

Greg Evans
Sunday 02 August 2020 09:45
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Picture:(ITV/PA/ANDY RAIN/EPA)

Nigel Farage has been criticised after calling an Afrikan Emancipation Day march in London "terrifying" and likened it to a "paramilitary-style force."

Crowds gathered in Brixton, south London to commemorate the passing of the 1883 Abolition of Slavery Act, with many also calling for reparations to be made to the descendants of slaves and the African nations that they were taken from, as reported by The Metro.

The event, which was organised by a coalition of groups attracted a huge gathering in Brixton, where speeches were given and music was played and a three-minute silence observed. It was the seventh year the event had taken place and was said to be "largely peaceful" with police having to make three arrests.

Deputy Assistant Commissioner Laurence Taylor, was quoted by the Evening Standard as saying:

The gatherings today have been largely peaceful and we thank our communities for working with us to ensure the voices of the community could be heard safely and done so responsibly to ensure the safety of all.

The demonstration which came just a few months after the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis sparked widespread Black Lives Matter protests across the world, is another powerful reminder to the extent of injustice and inequality that still exists.

As mentioned the protest was said to be peaceful but Nigel Farage couldn't help but find what he saw "terrifying" and accused the Black Lives Matter movement of attempting to "divide our society like never before."

The Brexit Party leader's comments sparked criticism on social media, with Jonathan Bartley, the co-leader of The Green Party accusing Farage of being the one "trying to create division."

Others echoed the criticism of the Brexiteer.

Back in June, Farage caused further disgust after he likened Black Lives Matter protesters who marched in the UK to the 'Taliban' after the statue of slave trader Edward Colston was removed and pushed into a river in Bristol.

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