MP accuses Priti Patel of 'pandering' to Nigel Farage's 'callous' hounding of migrants and 'playing into the hands of criminal gangs'
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Nigel Farage once again seems to have flouted social distancing rules in order to make a point about migration.

He tweeted yesterday afternoon that he had "just hit dry land in Dover" after coming across a "small inflatable" which was bailing out water with more than 20 people on board.

In a video he subsequently tweeted, he shows the boat and appears to understand the danger it's in, but doesn't bother to help, deciding to "guard' it instead.

While appearing to be just a few feet away from the boat, he says:

You can't believe, when you see how close the water is to edge, how massively overcrowded this is. We could put them under tow, but there's no point because we know the Border Force is on its way from Dover, so we will just keep guard here.

Farage then goes on to allege that a French navy vessel was escorting the migrant boats into British waters for it to be "handed over" to the British Coast Guard.

He also claims that he's been threatened by both British and French authorities to stop filming.

At the end of the video, he looks straight to camera and addresses Priti Patel, saying: "Home secretary, you've got to act."

People quickly responded, pointing out that there's no evidence for lots of his claims.

And of course that this shouldn't really be the number one priority for the British government right now.

A spokesperson for Christine Jardine, the Liberal Democrat shadow home affairs secretary, said:

The actions of Nigel Farage today are appalling. To disregard those struggling to survive in such a callous and heartless way is a new low, even for him.

Priti Patel's decision to pander to individuals such as Farage only increases incidents such as these.

 

By making it harder to come to the UK safely, the Conservatives are playing into the hands of criminal gangs who exploit desperate people for profit.

Priti Patel's controversial immigration bill, which would replace EU freedom of movement, was approved by the Commons earlier this week.

It has been widely criticised since it was announced in February, in particular for its definition of "unskilled worker", which encompasses a number of professions which the pandemic has proved are crucial to the functioning of society.

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