An Australian news reporter had a moment of awkwardness after noticing that she made an “error” by accidentally dressing as an anti-vaxxer.

On Tuesday, Nine News reporter Lizzie Daniels arrived at the scene to cover the public school teachers’ march in Sydney.

But soon after, she really regretted her decision to wear a white blouse.

Daniels realised that white clothing was worn by people who protest against Covid-19 vaccinations to differentiate themselves from vaccinated people.

Taking to her personal Twitter, Daniels spoke about the wardrobe mishap.

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“I’ve made an error. Rocked up to cover the teachers’ rally in a crisp white blouse, only to realise this is the ‘symbol’ to indicate the anti-vaxers in the crowd. Want to declare now I am double-dosed… just here for the news,” she wrote.

Wearing white clothing has been a regular occurrence among people attending “freedom fighter” anti-vaccine rallies around the country. The colour has been used in protests to mean peace and unity.

There is no indication that all of the people who wore white at the teachers’ rally had anti-vaccine views.

According to News.com.au, up to 400 schools were closed on Tuesday as teachers banded together in Sydney’s Hyde Park to march towards the NSW Parliament House.

Staff members left the job for a full day to protest a 2.5 per cent salary cap that had been present for over a decade. The union also says there is a massive teacher shortage in the state.

Many members of the crowd at the rally could also be seen wearing red and blue as they marched with banners that said #MoreThanThanks, to highlight their want for higher salaries.

Angelo Gavrielatos, the NSW Teachers Federation president, said open permanent teaching jobs had an uptick to over 3000 in mid-November.

On the other hand, transport workers also voiced concerns. Reportedly 300 bus drivers in Sydney’s south west walked off the job due to pay disagreements.

Train drivers have also been on strike over the privatisation and safety concerns over the trains.

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