Here's why you really don't need to worry about the Daily Express front page

The front of the Daily Express today is very angry about the prospect of EU asylum applications being processed by a central legislative body.

As part of the deal discussed on Monday at the EU summit, Britain will pay £500m in aid to Turkey to cope with the influx of refugees into the country.

From June, Turkish people could be able to move freely within the EU's Schengen zone (in which the UK is not included) for 90 days without a visa - if the deal is ratified later this month.

In exchange, Turkey will agree to swap one person who travelled by sea to the Greek islands for a Syrian refugee in a camp in Turkey, in an attempt to discourage the all-too-often fatal crossing attempts.

The front page story in the Express on Tuesday focuses instead upon the (older) news that the EU is overhauling refugee policy to shift responsibility for all claims to the European Asylum Support Office:

Brussels chiefs last night unveiled plans to end Britain's control over asylum seekers.

They want a centralised EU asylum force with power to meddle in the immigration policies of member states.

It is the European Commission's response to a crippling migration crisis and would give responsibility for overseeing asylum claims to a quango, the European Asylum Support Office. It could impose quotas of asylum seekers on countries - another huge extension of EU supremacy over national laws.

Ukip leader Nigel Farage warned Britain would be left with no control over who can and cannot stay.

Sort of, except for the Farage warning.

We have an opt-out...

Prime minister David Cameron tweeted a curt response regarding the concerns:

The opt out the prime minister refers to is with regard to matters of justice and home affairs - the UK would not be forced to join any new system.

So no - we wouldn't have new quotas imposed upon us from the new centralised office (as we currently don't at the present) due to our opt out.

And another thing...

People have also raised concern over the fact that people granted refugee status in the EU can obtain the right to move to most EU countries after living in the EU "legally and continuously" for five years. However, the UK is once again exempt to this legislation.

Refugees can move to the UK if they become a citizen of the country in which they are living under EU law on freedom of movement. This process can take between five and ten years and usually includes language conditions and citizenship tests - it is not automatic and is mostly at the discretion of EU governments.

So while it is true that the EU is centralising asylum policy within the European Asylum Support Office, it is not true that, in terms of legislation, the UK would have no control over its borders...

Picture: Ben Pruchnie/Getty Images
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