Women speak out after they were allegedly stalked via Apple Airtags
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Americans who have family members with Alzheimer's Disease have found a convenient way to keep tabs on their location - Apple Airtags.

The $30 tracking device was initially created to help people track the location of their things using Apple's 'Find My' technology.

But some caretakers have found the device is helpful in locating their loved ones who may wander away, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Those living with Alzheimer's are prone to wandering. If a person becomes confused or cannot recognize their surroundings, they may begin walking.

Other times, those who are feeling anxious, frustrated, or bored can wander off too, according to the Alzheimer's Association.

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Several people shared their stories using Airtags to track their loved ones when they wander, saying the device is an inexpensive and convenient way to track them.

Michelle Hirschboeck, who serves as the primary caretaker for her husband who has dementia, told the Wall Street Journal it helps her know where his last location was.

“Even though it was not exactly a real-time location, I knew which way he had gone and that he had not been far away a few minutes ago," Hirschboeck told the Wall Street Journal.

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Others shared similar stories on Reddit too, saying Airtags provided an extra layer of security when taking care of people with dementia.

While the ethics of using Airtags in this way is up for debate, some discourage others from relying on Airtags to keep loved ones living with dementia safe.

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Despite the newfound use for the device, Apple does not market the Airtag to be used on people. The company faced backlash after its initial release because people felt it could be used to stalk others.

Airtags now notify uses when a device is following them.

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