The internet has a funny way of resurfacing old clips at the perfect time. The latest video to go viral is a clip from the show Penn & Teller: Bulls***!

Hosted by professional magicians and skeptics, Penn Jillette and Teller, each episode of the show focuses on debating a variety of topics ranging from political to supernatural to more. As the name of the popular show suggests, Penn and Teller very bluntly criticize what they believe to be bull****.

Recently, their sketch on anti-vaccination from 2010 has made waves on Reddit; with many drawing similarities to the debate in America surrounding the Covid-19 vaccine.

"You may have heard vaccination causes autism in 1 out of 110 children," says Penn Jillette at the start of the clip. "F*** that. Total bull****.”

Vaccinations have always been an area of debate, especially among parents. With the current Covid-19 vaccine rollout, many have refused to get the vaccine due to a lack of belief in its effectiveness. Moreover, some anti-vaxxers have cited their overall distrust in science.

In the now-viral clip, Penn and Teller make a case against the anti-vaccine movement by demonstrating the success rate of those with vaccines against infectious diseases versus those without using bowling pins.

The two then proceed to throw tennis balls at the pins, with one side protected by plexiglass, representing those who are vaccinated. While one of the bowling pins in the vaccinated section was pushed out to symbolize a case of autism; the section with the plexiglass was much more protected from being knocked down more than the section without.

“As somebody who works in the field of infectious disease, I've always really liked this sketch - not strictly scientifically accurate, but a great visual demonstration,” one Reddit user wrote.

Another chimed in to reply that they enjoyed the fact that while the one pin representing autism was pushed out of line, it wasn’t knocked down. “Even if it caused it in this made-up scenario there is such a degree of autism that many of them can live normal lives just be a tad different,” they wrote.

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