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A pair of leggings featuring a print inspired by 1993 film Schindler’s List have sparked outrage after being seen on sale.

The item of clothing were first seen in a thrift store in Los Angeles and feature scenes from the Steven Spielberg Holocaust drama.

A picture of the design was posted to social media and shows a train track heading to Auschwitz, as well as Liam Neeson in character as German industrialist Oksar Schindler, who saved the lives of 1,200 Jewish lives during the Holocaust.

Twitter users were quick to comment on the design, with comedy writer Emily Murnane saying: “Babe, what’s wrong? You’ve hardly worn your Schindler’s List leggings.”

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Online marketplace Redbubble has now “restricted” sales of the design, which was also available to buy on products like iPhone cases, shower curtains and other items of clothing.

“The artwork referenced in this article has been restricted and we are adding additional monitoring measures as a result,” a Redbubble spokesperson told the Jewish Telegraphic Agency.

The Redbubble model allows independent designers to post their designs on the platform and then print them on products.

“With all content uploaded by third party users, occasionally there are content issues that arise that do not comply with our protocols,” the statement continued.

“We proactively monitor the marketplace each day and work to restrict certain designs from specific products when not appropriate.”

Redbubble has now restricted the design to be available only on “wall art,” with all other products featuring the design now unavailable on the site.

Schindler’s List also stars the likes of Ralph Fiennes, Ben Kingsley, and won the Academy Awards for best picture, best director, best adapted screenplay, and best original score.

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