The Bucket List trailer, 2007
Warner Bros.

It’s a common phrase which is part of our everyday vocabulary now, but social media users have been shocked to discover that the term “bucket list” is actually way younger than they thought.

While it feels like it’s been around much, much longer, it’s been revealed that the phrase actually comes from the movie of the same name, which was released back in 2007.

Which, incredibly, means it's only 15 years old.

James Rawson, social media producer for QI, brought the development to the attention of Twitter recently, and people can’t believe it.

He posted a screenshot from the Quartz Daily Brief, which reads: “The 2007 movie Bucket List invented the term. If you clearly remember it existing prior to that, you’re not alone - but it’s just an example of the Mandela effect.”

The Mandela effect, of course, being a situation in which a number of people believe something took place, when it didn’t.

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It’s thought that the movie’s script written by Justin Zackham is the moment the phrase was used in the way we understand it today for the first time.

Safe to say, the fact that such an established phrase is only 15 years old freaked a few people out.

“I choose not to believe that,” one user said, responding to the post.

“No. Sorry, I absolutely refuse to believe this is true,” another added.

How can the film only be 15 years old?Warner Bros.

As fans of the film know, Bucket List stars Jack Nicholson and Morgan Freeman as two terminally ill men who break free from a cancer ward and take a trip around the world with a long to-do list.

The term comes from a list of things people wish to achieve before they die, or “kick the bucket”.

Considering that idiom is thought to date back to the 16th century, it’s particularly surprising it took until 2007 for someone to come up with “bucket list”.

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