Black History Month: Radio host carries torch for music fest celebrating Black ...
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In the US, every February marks Black History Month, which is a way to appreciate the tremendous efforts of African Americans in history and their efforts into making the nation what it is today.

And there are numerous ways to commemorate the month from the comfort of your home or attending something in-person.

Whether that includes supporting Black-owned businesses or reading books written by Black authors, scroll below to see the ways you can celebrate this month and every day.

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1) Support organisations and charities that promote equality and safety

Following protests and conversations on police brutality and racial discrimination, organisations and charities that seek to eradicate injustices within the Black community require donors to propel their efforts.

Consider donating to Color Of Change, which was founded after Hurricane Katrina, is an online racial justice organisation that seeks to help and protect Black people who experienced devastating losses.

You can also donate to Live Free USA, an organisation that seeks to reduce the amount of gun violence and county jail incarcerations while using faith based institutions.

Check out a directory of social justice nonprofits at GivingCompass.org.

2) Show support to local and national Black owned businesses

Unfortunately, many Black-owned businesses still receive structural racism which can affect their ability to serve their communities long-term.

According to the Federal Reserve Bank, Black-owned businesses are twice as likely to be closed during the pandemic. Additionally, Goldman Sachs also discovered that 31 per cent of Black business owners said that that less than 25 per cent of their revenues before Covid have returned.

So, becoming a customer, especially this month when companies are gaining more visibility is an important step.

WeBuyBlack, the global marketplace for various Black-owned businesses that has been around since 2015 , and the app EatOkra, which has a directory of over 2,500 Black-owned restaurants around the US are great places to start.


3) Discover the contributions of prominent Black figures

The month highlights the achievements and contributions by well-known civil rights leaders such as Martin Luther King Jr, Rosa Parks and Frederick Douglass. However, there are other individuals who have contributed to the discourse.

For example, Chris Dickerson (born Henri Christophe Dickerson), was the first African American to become Mr America and Hannibal Caesar Carter was the second African American to serve as Mississippi’s Secretary of State.

You can find a comprehensive list of other notable figures at BlackPast.org.

4) Read books written by Black authors

Incorporate Black literature to your reading list today! The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass explores the famous orator and abolitionist’s time in Lynn Massachusetts.

There is also The Fire Next Time by James Baldwin which features two letters that explore the Black experience, religious authority and relationships with relatives.

5) Go to Black History Month events

Whether visiting in-person or virtual, attending Black History Month events are a fantastic way to get involved and build a stronger perspective. If you are in New York City, you can check out the 14th Annual Black History Month Celebration — Harlem Chamber Players at the Harlem school for the Arts.

And if you want to discover things virtually, check out the Facebook event called The History of Grand Rapids African American Museum and Archives (GRAAMA).

Other websites such as Eventbrite highlight a slew of Black History Month events that center around poetry, art, discussions and activism. The Association for the Study of African American Life and History’s website also details the month's theme "Black Health and Wellness" followed by their own events.

You can also check your city or state government websites for other event listings in your area.

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