<p>Nigel Farage was once a big media presence</p>

Nigel Farage was once a big media presence

PA

Nigel Farage’s latest Cameo has sparked an online debate about how funny it actually is to line his wallet, including some high profile commenters.

This follows after the investigative journalist Carole Cadwalladr got the former leader of The Brexit Party to give her a little push of motivation in these dark times that is 2021. Cadwalladr spent £63 on the video.

In the video, Farage said, “Your friend Jane wanted me to talk to you and say she knows your having a tough time”

He interestingly said “One thing I’ve always learnt is that good always triumphs over bad. Took me a very long time to prove my point and be right, and I’m sure if you have the courage of your convictions and right on your side, you will win.” In January 2020, Britain formally began proceedings to cut ties with the European Union, a lifelong political foe of Farage’s.

Reporting in The Observer, Cadawalladr broke the story about Cambridge Analytica in 2017, which suggested there links to Russia in the Brexiteer side of the 2016 referendum. Arron Banks, the leader of Leave.EU took her to court, citing libel which he won and she had to pay £62,000, according to a report byThe Press-Gazette.

Some people like Alastair Campbell, the spin doctor turned vocal government critic tweeted his support for the move.

However, this was not met with universal acclaim with people saying that giving Nigel Farage money was not the way to make a progressive point, instead, it was funding his very successful and profitable brand of hate.

It was revealed that Farage joined the video request service to help people commemorate special occasions, like upcoming Mother’s Day. He promised he would mention both Trump and Brexit.

Cameo is a website where you can book your favourite celebrity to send you a scripted, prerecorded message. There is a whole host of options to choose from, ranging from drag queen Tia Kofi and Donald Trump’s first Press Secretary Sean Spicer.

More: Why now is a critical time in the fight to end overfishing

Please log in or register to upvote this article
The Conversation (0)