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Channel Four news presenter Jon Snow has made an astute comment about the cancelling of the 2018 Queen's Speech by the government.

The speech traditionally takes place at the State Opening of Parliament, which sets out the governments legal programme for the coming year.

The government have decided that they will need more time to deal with Brexit next year and the huge amounts of legislation that goes along with it.

Andrea Leadsom, the Leader of the Commons, has confirmed that the next parliamentary session has been doubled in length by two years.

The decision has already been met with some controversy. Some interpreted the move as an attempt by Theresa May to cling to power.

Jon Snow has taken a slightly different approach to the subject and raised a very important issue about Brexit and housing.

A report from the housing and homelessness charity Shelter indicates that the number of homeless households has risen to more than 50,000 a year, while the Guardian reported in April states that more than 200,000 homes in England are empty.

The Queen's Speech could push for a housing reform, which is particularly prescient given the recent tragedy at Grenfell tower in North Kensington.

The tweet also highlights that an entire government does not need to negotiate leaving the European Union. A specialist department has been set up for this very task and is currently led by David Davis.

Snow's message won some supporters on Twitter who condemned the move by the Tories.

The cancellation of the 2018 speech isn't the first time the Queen's Speech has been called off.

In 2011, the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition cancelled the event, as part of the plans to move the state opening of parliament from autumn to spring.

Labour criticised the move at the time as abuse of power, a stance they also adopted in 1949, when the speech was also cancelled.

This year's speech (not the 2018 one) has been postponed for the first time ever, with Theresa May attempting to prop up her minority government with a DUP coalition.

The speech will now take place on Wednesday 21 June, as opposed to Monday 19 June.

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