Nigel Farage has had an eventful 24 hours.

After Boris Johnson and the EU announced they had agreed on a deal, the Brexit Party leader called for a Brexit extension, in a sharp departure from the three years he's spent urging us to “get on with it”.

He even defended the Benn Act, popularly known among Brexiteers as the 'Surrender Act' – which decrees that Mr Johnson must seek a further extension if no deal is agreed by parliament by 19 October – after Jean-Claude Juncker suggested the EU would not agree to push back the departure date to facilitate a deal.

To top it all off, Mr Farage was giving LBC his take on the new deal from outside the European Parliament and Kitty O'Shea's pub, when he was interrupted by someone shouting:

The UK is European, we are European!

While shouting the “UK is European” is probably not the strongest argument considering nobody’s planning to reassign us to another continent (although we haven’t seen Trump’s trade deal proposals yet), it does highlight the level of sadness felt by many since the UK’s isolationist decision.

Mr Farage eventually managed to deliver his message, which raises questions if the heckler was actually doing him a favour. He told LBC:

Mr Barnier has been explicit that any future trade agreement means that we will have to surrender our fisheries and whats more have regulatory alignment on employment law, environmental law and taxation. 

That was the kicker – taxation. 

Once more for those in the back?

That was the kicker – taxation.

Mr Farage does not specify which taxation laws he is unhappy with, but there is one in particular that some Brexiteers are keen to avoid.

The EU is set to introduce a new tax directive at the start of 2019, which will target corporate tax avoidance.

A no-deal Brexit would mean Britain was never subject to such a law and could pave the way for longstanding plans to turn parts of the UK into a Singapore-style tax-free zone.

Some people appeared concerned for Mr Farage after the day's events.

For those fearing for Mr Farage’s future career once Britain leaves the EU, rest assured he has the option of a promising role as a YouTuber.

The platform has been kind to Mr Farage, with viral clips of him delivering furious speeches in the European Parliament during his rare appearances helping to hugely build his fame abroad.

He went as far as to say in his 2015 book The Purple Revolution that the site “saved his career”.

On 11 April, less than a fortnight after the current Halloween Brexit deadline was announced, Mr Farage created his own personal channel, which opens up the potential for monetisation.

As of 14 October, the number of views on his official videos had surged by 460 per cent in just 30 days to 1,359,215, Sky News revealed.

At the time of writing, he has more than 38,000 subscribers - overtaking the Conservative Party with just over 37,300.

Keep reading...Show less
Please log in or register to upvote this article
The Conversation (0)