Sand artists and Sir David Attenborough bring T. rex to Welsh beach
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A new nature documentary narrated by David Attenborough on dinosaurs has viewers stunned by how realistic the extinct animals appear.

Prehistoric Planet will consist of five episodes, each one focusing on a different species of dinosaur that existed in different parts of the world 66 million years ago. Like other nature documentaries narrated by Attenborough, each episode will have a storyline following a specific dinosaur.

The miniseries began airing on Apple TV on Monday, May 23. A new episode is expected to be released each day of the week.

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Dinosaur lovers and Attenborough fans alike expressed excitement for the documentary and upon the release, many noted that the dinosaurs looked incredible realistic

"The #PrehistoricPlanet dinosaurs & pterosaurs look waaaay better than the ones in #JurassicWorldDominion& not just because they're more up to date. They're higher in quality AND the designs are actually inspiring, not bland or boring like JW dinosaurs. (I'm excited for both btw)," a Twitter account wrote.

The film used CGI technology and photorealism concepts in order to make the prehistoric creatures as life-like as possible while remaining accurate to their appearances.

"When I was a little girl and became obsessed with Jurassic Park, I used to constantly walk around and think about what animals had once stood in the same place as I was. Prehistoric Planet has truly brought my childhood imagination to life, it feels so real," another Twitter user said.

"Prehistoric Planet has once again solidified that realism with animals can provide way better story telling than another certain franchise’s philosophy of making everything scary for entertainment," Justin wrote on Twitter.

Fans can delight in watching the life-like dinosaurs roam the Earth while listening to the familiar and calm sound of Attenborough's voice.

Attenborough, 96, is known for his nature documentary narration. The UK natural historian narrated Planet Earth, Life on Earth, and over a hundred others.

The film was promoted by placing dinosaur footprints in the sand at a Welsh beach.

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