'The New York Times' Buys Wordle
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We won't spoil the answer for you, but today's Wordle had a lot of British people angry, including the British embassy.

Wordle, the online word puzzle, has taken the world by storm. It's forced people to use English language cues and creative thinking to solve the 5-letter word every day. But like most Brits today, we've learned that the type of English you follow matters.

The British Embassy in Washington DC tweeted today trolling today's Wordle, which is spelled the American way rather than the British way.

In most British spelling, words that sound like "or" typically include a "u" in between the "o" and "r", like neighbour, favourite, and colour. But in the US that "u" is removed.

Similarly, words that sound like "eyes" typically include an "s" rather than a "z", like realise, apologise, and organise.

This slight difference makes it a bit more difficult for UK Wordle solvers to figure out the word.

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The irony in Wordle using American spelling only is the creator, Josh Wardle, is Welsh. So why was it programmed to use American spelling?

Well, Wardle created the game for his partner, Palak Shah, and at the time the two were living in Brooklyn, New York. So he followed American spelling.

You can take your problems up with Mr. Wardle, Brits.

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