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We've all doubted our partner's commitment sometimes - it's very tricky to be 100 per cent trusting. But instead of breaching their privacy by checking their phone behind their back, why not try searching for clues within their personality.

Apparently the types of people most likely to cheat are those with 'avoidant attachment styles' - a hard to find scientific term that almost seems to scream 'adultery'.

People with this personality type find intimacy and being attached to once person uncomfortable.

GenevieveBeaulieau-Pelletier, an author of several studies on the subject, explained:

Even if we get married with the best of intentions things don't always turn out the way we plan.

Unlike more traditional reason for cheating (such as an insatiable libido or office romance) - the most common reason for cheating for those withavoidant attachment styles was simply the desire to distance themselves from commitment and their partner.

Beaulieau-Pelletier continued:

Infidelity could be a regulatory emotional strategy used by people with an avoidant attachment style. 

The act of cheating helps them avoid commitment phobia, distances them from their partner, and helps keep their space and freedom. 

It has been theorised that this personality type may be a result of poor parental relationships or a high value placed on independence.

Beaulieau-Pelletier added:

Contrary to popular belief, infidelity isn't more prevalent in men.

 

While investigating avoidant attachment style, Beaulieau-Pelletier conducted a number of studies with people of various ages, exploring their reasons for commitment in relationships and cheating.

One study involved 145 students with an average age of 23. Of those surveyed, 68 per cent had thought about cheating while 41 per cent had actually cheated. The results, according to Beaulieau-Pelletier, indicated a strong correlation between infidelity and people with an avoidant attachment style.

HT Spring

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