“Get Brexit done”, Boris Johnson spluttered over the course of his 2019 election campaign, three years after the country marginally voted to leave the EU.

But two years after that, and five years after the initial referendum, we are still witnessing the issues that the policy has thrown up. Brexit, we’re afraid, is by no means “done”.

Take this working week, for instance. The earth has spun on its axis just five times and in that time Brexit has managed to cause absolute chaos for businesses due to lorry driver shortages, chaos for businesses due to terrible trade deals or lack thereof, and even the international press are laughing at us.

Here are all the embarrassing Brexit moments that have happened just this week alone:

Grant Shapps claims Brexit has actually been good for the HGV lorry driver shortage

Transport secretary Grant ShappsTransport secretary Grant ShappsSky News

Despite industry bodies saying the complete opposite, Shapps took to Sky News on Friday morning to claim that Brexit has helped plug a shortage of almost 100,000 drivers because it has enabled the government to process a change in the way tests will operate - which have also incidentally been slammed for being potentially dangerous for road safety.

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Brexit, according to the Road Haulage Association (RHA) has made drivers leave the country and has created bureaucracy slowing down the routes in which goods enter the country. But thanks, Shapps.

Priti Patel’s new border rules challenged for ‘breaking international law’

1974 Birmingham Pub BombingsPA

Priti Patel’s new asylum plan stigmatises those seeking asylum in the UK as “unworthy and unwelcome” and creates a two-tier system that would be in violation of international law, the UN Refugee Agency has said.

The bill would criminalise asylum-seekers who enter the UK without permission meaning they could spend four years in prison but human rights groups and bodies have slammed Patel’s vision for post-Brexit Britain.

International press embarrassed by Britain

A series of front pages and headlines in European papers have called Britain out for Brexit leading to food shortages and

No worries, Boris Johnson, it’s not like international diplomacy and good relations is in any way useful for the UK.

US trade deal comments come back to haunt Brexiteers

Comments made about the ease with which Britain would secure a trade deal with the US after Brexit have come back to bite Brexiteers after Biden and Johnson failed to create meaningful deals during talks in the US this week.

A video showed just how much Johnson’s messaging about the potential deal has gone from enthusiastic to flat in the last few years, while a clip of Raab saying that there could even have been a deal made before the 2020 presidential election is also doing the rounds.

Awkward.

Petrol shortages cause stations to close

REUTERS

Just as Brexit came for supermarkets and high street restaurants, it has now caused a “handful” of BP stations, and a small number of Esso-owned Tesco Alliance stations to close because of a lack of lorry drivers to deliver supplies of petrol. Oh, dear.

Speaking to the BBC, Shapps said the government could bring in the army to help if needs be but urged motorists to continue as normal.

That’s fine then.

David Lammy expertly slams Grant Shapps over post-Brexit supply issues

David Lammy delivered a brilliant monologue on Question Time schooling Shapps on the supply chain crisis.

“What we’re looking at is a winter of discontent,” he said.

“We have shortages of staff, shortages of supplies and shortages of skills. Why has this happened? It largely happened because of the promises that your party made on Brexit which have not been delivered. Where is the trade deal with the United States? Where is the trade deal with India? We haven’t got one.

“Why haven’t you invested in further education? Where are the night schools?

“Of course we need to get on with the visas so that these people can come in and it's not just HGV drivers it’s fruit pickers, it’s caterers, it’s people in concert halls. Right across this country, there are shortages. You promised that immigration would come down and you know that it needs to go up if we’re to deal with these problems.”

You tell him.

Market worker’s sarcastic response about how Brexit has raised food costs goes viral

A wholesale market worker in Manchester gave Remainers a chuckle when she sarcastically slammed Brexit for causing inflation.

Mariella Gabutt told a reporter: “The price of a container pre-Brexit (because it’s nothing to do with Brexit) pre-Brexit was £3,000 just over for one container, the same container, the same goods cost £14,000 now. Massive jump, of course, there’s inflation.”

The clip did the round on social media as people praised her for her sassiness.

Brexiteer’s promise that post-Brexit Britain will not be like Mad Max haunts him

A Brexiteer’s assertion that Britain will not be “plunged into a Mad Max-style world borrowed from dystopian fiction” after Brexit has resurfaced due to the petrol shortages and other issues we have seen this week.

David Davis made the comments while he was Brexit secretary in 2018 in an address to business leaders in Vienna.

Turkey supplier blames Brexit for supply issues

A Turkey farmer has not minced his words. Speaking to Byline TV, Paul Kelly blamed Brexit for creating issues with labour supply and warned these problems will get worse over the busy festive period.

“The reason we’re having all these issues is entirely because of Brexit and nothing else,” he said.

“The people that we used to have coming into the country to pluck and pack our turkeys, they’re no longer allowed in.

“Come Christmas, the workload doubles if not trebles and the people aren’t there.”

He added that he has had to throw away produce as there are not enough workers to process it.

“It’s an absolute nightmare,” he said. “There will be a car crash come Christmas”.

EU ID scheme causes airport headache fears

Queues of people wait in line at U.K. citizens arrivals at Heathrow Airport in LondonREUTERS

Concerns have been raised that that EU citizens living in the UK may not be allowed to board flights into the country because of confusing new ID rules.

From 1st October, EU citizens who do not have the post-Brexit right to live in the UK will not be able to use EU, EEA or Swiss national ID cards to enter the country for short visits and Brussels is concerned that airlines will struggle to make the distinction between them and permanent residents at boarding gates as residency cards have not been issued yet.

So how is everyone enjoying our sovereignty?

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