<p>She candidly stated she “got a UTI on, like, day 32 along with a couple of other women” </p>

She candidly stated she “got a UTI on, like, day 32 along with a couple of other women”

@laurenashleybeck/TikTok

Survivor: Island of the Idols contestant Lauren-Ashley Beck made a shocking claim that players had to wear the same underwear “for 38-days straight” which resulted in many women contracting UTIs.

In a viral TikTok, which has racked up almost half a million views since Wednesday, Beck responded to a question about the “whole 38-day panty situation.”

The 32-year-old confirmed that contestants do wear the same pair for over 5-weeks. She candidly stated she “got a UTI on, like, day 32 along with a couple of other women” and suspects this is because they had “to wear the same underwear as a swimsuit.”

She claimed that while the show offered antibiotics to treat their infections and “new underwear” was provided to the Survivor contestants, producers “stepped on them in the dirt and then made us wear them” – “to throw in a little razzle-dazzle,” she added.

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“If the creators of Survivor had cootches, this would not happen,” one suggested, in which Beck passionately agreed: “THIS THIS RIGHT MFN HERE.”

“That sounds illegal,” another added, while another slammed the treatment as “straight-up sadistic.”

“Say you’re lying right now... please tell me they didn’t actually step on them,” another pressed Beck.

“I think being honest all of the time is probably my weakness,” the Survivor contestant responded.

Beck claimed the show gave them new underwear that had been rubbed in dirt YouTube

Giuseppe Aragona, MD, a general practitioner for Prescription Doctor, said:  “Wearing dirty underwear quite simply traps sweat, dirt, and bacteria, holding them close to your skin in a particularly sensitive area,”

“You may be thinking that you can get away with wearing it for an extra day—like you might a T-shirt if didn’t smell—but underwear is used to protect particularly dark, moist, and sweaty areas which can far more quickly be affected by the sealing of sweat, dirt, and bacteria.”

Indy100 has reached out to CBS for comment.

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