If you’ve as much opened your phone or laptop in the last few days it’s likely you’ve seen people sharing their Spotify Wrapped data on social media - detailing the top artists and songs they’ve listened to and how much music they’ve consumed.

And while everyone uses it as a chance to show off about their impeccable taste, one woman has gone one step further and claimed she has listened to more music on the app than any other person in the UK.

Speaking to Lad Bible, Regan, a 20-year-old from Cambridgeshire said she was “shocked” to learn she had listened to an incredible 230,664 minutes of music in the last 12 months, which works out as 3,844 hours or around 160 days of back-to-back tunes, so quite a bit then.

She said: “I was pretty shocked when it said I had beaten 100 percent of the UK; I knew I listened to a lot of music but that was just insane.

“I listen to music pretty much from the second I wake up to when I go to sleep. I listen to it while playing games, watching TV - I had an earphone in for every single shift I worked this year.”

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According to the music streaming service, she listened to more music than 100 per cent of UK users but what’s on her playlists?

Spotify reckons she listened to ‘Famous Prophets (Stars)’ by Car Seat Headrest 1,199 times.

“I found that song at the end of July and I have never been obsessed with an album the way I am with Twin Fantasy,” she said.

“The fact that my top song is 16 minutes long is so funny to me.”

She added: “I really like that song in particular as it’s very long and it has many phases and tells a great story when played in the context of the rest of the album.

“It’s an album about teenage relationships and how people you meet when you’re younger will keep resurfacing in your mind for the rest of your life.”

Sharing more of her Spotify Wrapped results, Regan revealed her top artists were Lana Del Rey, Pink Floyd, Kendrick Lamar, Jack White and Car Seat Headrest, while her ‘audio aura’ was ‘bold’ and ‘energy’.

We can think of worse claims to fame.

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