Picture;
Picture;
Getty Images / PETER PARKS / Contributor

Elon Musk might not appeal to everyone but there is no denying that he has done some great things in the name of science and progress.

Earlier this year, he sent his car into space, he is helping teach kids in Africa how to read, and his company Tesla have made a huge battery that is powering the entire region of South Australia.

Yet one thing he definitely hasn't done is invent the subway systems that we see in major cities around the world - and have done for decades.

In a recent information session discussing his plans for the Boring Company and the future of travel in Los Angeles, the South African entrepreneur made a statement which sounded like he was claiming to have just invented the idea of rapid transit.

Motherboard quotes him as saying:

If you do hundreds of tunnels and have dozens of small stations woven throughout the fabric of the city, you can actually, without even the city appearing different, you could solve the transport problem.

Compared to an above-ground system or compared to a flying car, you don’t have to worry about bad weather.

You can’t see it, hear it, feel it, you’re not dividing communities with lanes, and we think we can make this really fun

that sounds shockingly similar to a subway system Elon, kind of like the ones you get in London, New York and Paris.

Musk's statement didn't go unnoticed on Twitter.

Users have been mocking him for his bold claim and the notion that only Silicon Valley inventors have the right to change the way we live our lives.

Musk's plans for the Boring Company is - if you haven't already guessed - basically a high-speed subway system in LA, which will help ease the city's long-standing problem with traffic.

He has already unveiled 2.7 miles of track as proof of concept and recently got approval from the city to conduct tests.

The end goal would then be to have a system of individual cars that could travel up to 150mph and would only cost $1 per ride.

Should his tests be successful Musk then hopes to allow the public free rides on the system and better understand the user experience.

HT Mashable

Keep reading...Show less
Please log in or register to upvote this article
The Conversation (0)